Have questions about being Big?

Frequently Asked Questions

Q:  Do Bigs receive any training or help once we’re matched?

A:  Yes, you will attend an in-person training that walks you through situational scenarios to help prepare you for your Match.  In addition, your Match Support Specialist will be there every step of the way to offer customized support as your Match progresses.  We also offer monthly training sessions facilitated by a licensed therapist.

Q:  How often do Bigs and Littles get together?

A:  Community-based Bigs meet a minimum of twice per month.  School-based Bigs meet once a week when school is in session,

Q:  What support is provided to me and my Little?

A:  Anytime you are unsure about things, your Match Support Specialist is willing to help.  They can provide you with ideas for activities, guidance for handling possible difficult situations, and feedback on how you are making a difference.

Q:  How long is my volunteer commitment?

A:  We focus on one-to-one relationships between you and your Little.  And for relationships to be impactful and effective, they have to take time.  That’s why we require a minimum one-year commitment.  However, most friendships last longer.  Some even last a lifetime.

Q:  What are some good ideas for outings with my Little?

A:  Share an activity that gives you something in common to talk about. Go to the library, check out a book and read together. Buy a comic book to read together. Play a board game. Go on a nature walk. Hit a bucket of golf balls at the local driving range. Take a ride in the car with the radio on and talk about the music you like. You want to select activities that give each of you a chance to learn more about one another. For children, playing can be learning. Most important: keep it simple and enjoy yourselves!

Q:  What are some good ideas for outings with my Little?

A:  Share an activity that gives you something in common to talk about. Go to the library, check out a book and read together. Buy a comic book to read together. Play a board game. Go on a nature walk. Hit a bucket of golf balls at the local driving range. Take a ride in the car with the radio on and talk about the music you like. You want to select activities that give each of you a chance to learn more about one another. For children, playing can be learning. Most important: keep it simple and enjoy yourselves!